5 Tips For A Perfect Viewing

Viewings are one of the most important parts of the buying process, it allows a prospective buyer to find out more about the property and the area and ultimately it will help them decide if it’s really the place for them to call home.

As the seller, you want your property to give off the very best impression and ultimately find someone who thinks it feels like home to them. The process can be long and stressful, so these 5 tips might just help you along the way to preparing for, and hosting the perfect viewing.

First impressions really do count!

Viewings are always arrange for a mutually appropriate time, so if you then are unable to make it at the last minute or are browsing the aisles of your local supermarket whilst someone waits on your doorstep, you might as well rule that viewing out. Make sure you’ve spent some time cleaning and making a fresh and welcoming environment, whilst you want the property to be respectable, remember it isn’t a show home and showing it’s lived in can help to make people a little more comfortable. Some bright seasonal flowers and lots of nice natural light always make a property seem more welcoming.

Kerb Appeal

Whilst, it’s important to have the inside of the property looking spot on, how does your property look from the road? If you’ve got an overgrown front garden trim it back and make it presentable so that when the potential buyers pull up outside, they can see a nice clear view of the property. If it looks like it’s poorly maintained, you could get off on the wrong foot and they may enter the property with a negative impression.

Make it feel like home

It’s your home and the prospective buyers will be quite aware of this – you know it best so showing off the best features of the property and even telling little quirky anecdotes of the time your kids turned the under-stairs cupboard into their den will help them to picture their family calling it home.

Don’t be pushy

You’re not there to push someone in to buying your home, you’re there to show them around the property and learn how fantastic it is. Sometimes it takes a buyer a little bit of time to decide if a property is right for them, making good impressions and answering any questions that they may have will always help them to make a decision of their own.

Keep the best for last

Make like a magician and have something up your sleeve that the buyers aren’t expecting. Whilst you should start with a nice feature like your fantastic new kitchen, when you’re coming to the end of the viewing slip in another feature that will really impress, show off your mature, landscaped garden or the stunning views from your loft-room – adding these in last will make your home stick in their mind and will add a talking point when they begin to shortlist further.

How to Choose Accommodation for you Second Year of University

Securing the right accommodation can have a major impact on your university experience though, so be prepared and start your search early.

Find out how to get organised, where to look and what to keep in mind with our handy guide.

Know your options

After first year, when the majority of students live in university-owned halls, there are various different options available to you. From rented, shared accommodation in private housing to living in the increasingly popular private halls, it is important to consider what will work best for you.

If you’re looking for a bit more independence, renting a property with a group of friends could be the best option. However, beware of a few potential pitfalls. It is essential to rent from a reputable estate agent. Unfortunately it’s not uncommon for students to face complications with landlords when it comes to paying the bills and fixing repairs. Make sure you ask your university or students’ union for a list of recommendations if you’re unsure.

If you don’t feel comfortable signing contracts for shared accommodation or keeping on top of your bills, private halls are the ideal solution. The great thing about living in halls is that all the paperwork is handled for you, meaning you can cut out on any potential problems from landlords or letting agencies.

Work out your budget

Depending on how much you’re willing to spend, certain options may not be practical. If money is tight, living by yourself is obviously not the most sensible option. Don’t forget all the hidden costs from bills, including internet, TV licence and every student’s nightmare: the central heating.

Teaming up with friends for a shared rental allows you to split the bills and potentially save some money. You need to keep in mind the initial admin costs though which really can add up, as well as any damages that may incur a hefty bill from your landlord.

Some areas of the country are notorious for poor student rental experiences, so if that’s something you are worrying about, private halls might be the perfect match. Dispelling the myth that private halls are super pricey, there are plenty of affordable options in many major cities across the country. These student housing companies often take care of your bills for you, also providing a nice little internet package included in the price of your rent.

Pick the people

Avoid those petty arguments about whose dirty dishes have been on the side for the past week by carefully picking the people you want to live with. There’s no denying that student properties can get a little bit on the messy side, so try to avoid this by ensuring that the people you want to live with will all abide by house rules.

Choosing your friends early on can be scary though. Often the start of the new calendar year is when students secure their accommodation for second year, and if you’re still not feeling settled or haven’t built a strong friendship circle yet, this can be daunting.

Private halls have a fun community vibe which can offer a great way to meet new people and make some amazing friends. This is also a bonus if you’ve been living at home for your first year and are looking to move closer to the university for their second year.

Check the location

You may have found the ideal house share or flat but if it’s miles away from campus it will make that morning commute to lectures a bit harder. Whether you’re at university in one of the UK’s major cities or somewhere slightly smaller you’ll need to know your way around.

For those with a fear of missing out who like to be in the middle of things, private rentals are normally situated close by the university. If you’re looking to save on costs, living a bit outside the centre may help but you’ll need to make sure there are strong transport links to get you in on time.

It’s also worth thinking about the positioning of the property. If you’re a light sleeper or you’re easily distracted, you might not want to live somewhere that’s on a busy and noisy main road or close to train tracks.

Check out the local area too. You’ll regret not having a supermarket just down the road when you run out of milk or bread in the morning.

Top 10 Tips & Tricks For Making A Move Simple

5 hacks for dressing your house to sell

1) Define your rooms

Rooms are more appealing to buyers if they have a specific purpose. Make sure each room is set for its designated purpose – if it’s a three-bedroom house make sure it is just that, as bedrooms add more value to properties than studies or store rooms.

2) De-clutter and clean

Clutter can make your home seem small and disorganised, so de-cluttering will help buyers to visualise how the house will look when they’ve moved in. Minimise lotions and potions in the bathroom, put excess clothes away, thin out books on the bookcase and clear surfaces in the kitchen. Then it’s time to give everything a thorough clean and light some scented candles to make your home even more inviting.

3) Natural colours

Most buyers prefer natural colours to bold tones as they can make a room feel brighter and more spacious. Splashes of colour can be added with accessories and the right lighting can also help to enhance the space.

4) Make an impression

First impressions really do count. You can maximise your home’s kerb appeal by making sure there is no litter in the front garden, pathways are clear and the front door is painted. Plant pots can add a splash of colour and you can always take them with you when you go. The hallway is equally important – a mirror can make it look bigger and create that wow-factor as people cross the threshold.

5) Do those DIY jobs

If there are DIY jobs that you’ve been putting off for ages, start working your way through them. Dripping taps, broken blinds, peeling paint and squeaky hinges are all off-putting to buyers and can be fixed quickly and easily.

Five hacks for packing and moving

1) Separate the essentials

Pack an overnight bag for each family member and use a clear plastic box to keep your daily essentials together (kettle, mugs, teabags etc) so you can access them easily during and after the move.

2) Label Label Label

Buy a pack of parcel labels in different sizes, colour coded if you’re really serious, and label every box with the room and main contents. You can also use labels on chargers and cables to remember what goes with which device, as well as labelling items that are to be donated to charity, binned or sold.

3) Invest in good boxes

Decent boxes can be used time and time again, folded down or used to keep your loft tidy. So buying good quality boxes is always a solid investment. You may even be able to source these for free from shops but make sure they’re strong and not too large otherwise you won’t be able to move them once they’re full.

4) Save bags of time when packing clothes

Save time when packing your wardrobe contents by keeping all of your clothes on their hangers and placing a tie top bin bag over the bottom. You can then tie the tops around the hangers and your clothes are ready to be hung up as soon as they are in the new house.

5) Ask your friends and family for help and offer a ‘reward’

While moving can be stressful, having friends and family to help can actually make it fun. And if you sweeten the deal, perhaps with the offer of a takeaway at the end of it, you may find you have even more willing volunteers.